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Rescuers are desperate to find anyone who might miraculously have survived this week's quake that killed at least 250 people and injured more than 360 others in central Italy.


The Italian Council of Ministers approved a state of emergency for the regions affected by the earthquake Thursday, allocating 50 million euros of emergency funding.





Suddenly there was a foot, a leg, and then the other leg.


The girl, later identified as 8-year-old Giorgia, was finally pulled out with great care to a rousing cheer. The body of her sister, 10, was next to her, ANSA said.

































Surveying Italy's earthquake damage 01:26




Rescuers are desperate to find anyone who might miraculously have survived this week's quake that killed at least 250 people and injured more than 360 others in central Italy.


The Italian Council of Ministers approved a state of emergency for the regions affected by the earthquake Thursday, allocating 50 million euros of emergency funding.


A 4.1 magnitude aftershock on Thursday shook aid workers as they sorted through debris in the afternoon sun in the town of Amatrice, one of many tremors to have followed Wednesday morning's 6.2-magnitude quake that reduced villages to rubble.


A CNN crew in Amatrice was filming in front of a house when the structure partially collapsed, and others around it were completely flattened.


"People were just running onto the roads away from buildings in a panic. We saw our cameras shaking, and journalists here too were panicking," said CNN producer Margot Haddad.



It was more bad news for rescuers, who have been desperately combing through mountains of rubble for a second day. Wednesday's quake blocked off narrow streets in ancient towns, making the rescue operation extremely difficult.






Photos: Earthquake strikes central Italy


A rescue worker drives a truck of rubble as cleanup operations begin in Amatrice.








Photos: Earthquake strikes central Italy


Rescuers make their way through destroyed houses in Pescara del Tronto, Italy, on Thursday, August 25, after a 6.2-magnitude earthquake struck the central part of the country. Hundreds of people have been killed, and the death toll is expected to rise as rescue teams reach remote areas.


With heavy lifting equipment just starting to reach isolated villages and towns that were cut off by landslides and building debris, people used tractors, farm equipment and simple hand tools to break through what was left of old stone villas.


"Many cases have shown in the past that even after two days, people can be rescued alive," said Luigi D'Angelo from Italy's Civil Protection agency. "So we want to continue."


CNN correspondent Frederik Pleitgen saw machinery moving in through the narrow lanes in Amatrice and rescuers using sniffer dogs to help find more bodies.


















































BEFORE: GOOGLE, AFTER: FILIPPO MONTEFORTEFILIPPO MONTEFORTE/AFP/GETTY IMAGES


But rescuers, including foreign search crews, were also using sound detectors, hoping to find more survivors.


"They know right now it's a race against time. They believe it's about 72 hours those people would be able to survive," Pleitgen said.





"In most cases, unfortunately, the only thing they're able to retrieve is their bodies and that's one of the reasons why we've seen the death toll rise so much overnight."

No happy stories here





Giorgia's survival is sadly an anomaly so far in the massive rescue operation, which involves more than 5,400 rescuers from Italy's Civil Protection agency, and many more from outside groups.


In Saletta, a town of just 20 homes less than a mile from the quake's epicenter, an eerie quiet has taken over.


"We saw unfortunately only bodies pulled out," CNN contributor Barbie Nadeau said from the village, where 22 people were killed.



"We didn't see any happy stories here," she added.


Source:


http://www.cnn.com/2016/08/25/europe/italy-earthquake/

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